Wierd 409 dies, aged 21, in South Africa

July 19, 2020

KFPS Studbook stallion Wierd 409 (Folkert 353) died at the South African Doorndraai Friesian Stud on Saturday the 18th of July. In mid-June his owner Marlise Botes already reported that the stallion’s health was quickly deteriorating after he had suffered a heart attack. In the end a second heart attack just a few weeks after his 21st birthday, proved fatal.

Star of the Performance Test 2003

Wierd 409 Sport was born as Wierd ut ‘e Polder in the De Jong family yard in Nij Beets on the 29th of June 1999. He is a son of Folkert 353 Sport Preferent and the Star Preferent Tsjitske ut de Polder (Reitse 272), pedigree 12. Wierd 409 successfully completed his Central Examination in 2003 at the age of four. Together with Beart 411 he came top of the list at the Performance Test, where Wierd 409 received a 9 for his showdriving test and an 8,3 for his trot. In progeny testing his offspring mainly achieved average performances in sport and exterior.

Successful with Frits de Jong

With expert driver Frits de Jong holding the reins Wierd 409 was a striking appearance at competitions. The stallion acquired his Sport predicate thanks to fine performances in the Honorary Class Showdriving where he became Dutch Champion on several occasions, for example with Setske de Jong in the Ladies’ Class. Also remarkable was his stint at the musical spectacle for Friesian horses Faderpaard, where outgoing KFPS Chairman Cees Rozemond was treated to a sleigh ride pulled by Wierd 409 and with top dressage rider Adelinde Cornelissen in the driver’s seat.

From Norway to South Africa

In 2014 the stallion moved to Norway where he became the first KFPS-approved Studbook stallion. End 2015 Wierd 409 moved stables again, this time to Doorndraai Friesian Stud in South Africa, where he became stable mates with Tjalf 443 Sport. Owner Marlise Botes posted the message of Wierd 409’s demise on Facebook. ‘He has been with us for just 4½ years, but just like all other stallions he was absolutely part of the family.’